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Workshop on the Physics of Fine-Tuning: Stars, Galaxies, and the Multiverse

REGISTRATION & CONTACT

 
The registration for the "3rd Workshop on the Physics of Fine-Tuning: Stars, Galaxies, and the Multiverse" is free. Click here to register.

For any enquiries regarding this please email Leanne O'Donnell.

 
ORGANISING COMMITTEE
 
Rafael Alves Batista
Khalil Chamcham
Roger Davies
Leanne O'Donnell
Joe Silk
David Sloan
 
VENUE & DIRECTIONS
 
The workshop will take place in Trinity College on the 12th of May. Directions can be found in the here.
 
SCHEDULE
14.00-14.10
Welcome
Roger Davies
(University of Oxford)

 

14.10-15.00
Observer selection and fine-tuning puzzles in cosmology [abstract] [slides]
John Peacock
(University of Edinburgh)
chair:
Roger Davies
15.00-15.50
The Limits of Cosmology [abstract] [slides]
Joe Silk
(University of Oxford; IAP; Johns Hopkins Uni.)
chair:
David Sloan
15.50-16.20 Coffee Break    
16.20-17.10
How do galaxies know when, where and how quickly to form stars [abstract] [slides]
Adrianne Slyz
(University of Oxford)
chair:
Rafael Alves Batista
17.10-17.40 Round Table Discussion

 

 

 

ABSTRACTS

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Observer Selection and Fine-Tuning Puzzles in Cosmology
John Peacock (University of Edinburgh)
 
This talk reviews areas of the standard cosmological model in which parameters can be argued to take un-natural values. Observer selection within a multiverse has been proposed as a way of explaining these difficulties; the successes and difficulties of this approach are discussed.
 
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The Limits of Cosmology
Joe Silk (University of Oxford; Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris; Johns Hopkins University)
 
One of our greatest challenges is understanding the origin of the structure of the universe. I will describe how the fossil radiation from the beginning of the universe, the cosmic microwave background, has provided a  window for probing the initial conditions from which structure evolved. Infinitesimal  variations in temperature on the sky  provide the fossil fluctuations that seeded the formation of the galaxies.  I will discuss how one might follow up on the Planck satellite which has given us a remarkable confirmation to high precision of what has become known as the “standard model of cosmology.” This model establishes a robust framework around which a number of fundamental issues remain unresolved. In order to make further progress, what is our optimal choice of future strategy?
 
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How do galaxies know when, where and how quickly to form stars?
Adrianne Slyz (University of Oxford)

 

Despite differences in their cosmological life stories, galaxies follow a seemingly simple script for star formation: gas transforms itself to stars at a rate which depends on the average gas surface density of a galaxy. For years, galaxy formation simulations have exploited this simple global relationship to make stars, but nature is indicating that more than gas surface density is at play. Turbulence in the star forming gas appears to be key. I will describe the evidence for this and current theoretical ideas of how turbulence controls the rate of star formation in galaxies. I will then discuss attempts to capture the effect of turbulence on star formation in high resolution cosmological simulations of individual galaxies which incorporate results from resolved molecular cloud simulations. Consequences for stellar feedback, galaxy morphology, interstellar medium structure and dynamics will be presented.