You are here

4th Workshop: Dark Matter(s)

REGISTRATION & CONTACT

 
The registration for the "4th Workshop on the Physics of Fine-Tuning: Dark Matter(s)" is free. Click here to register.
 

For any enquiries regarding this please email Leanne O'Donnell.

 
ORGANISING COMMITTEE
 
Rafael Alves Batista
Khalil Chamcham
Roger Davies
Michael T. Hicks
Leanne O'Donnell
Joe Silk
David Sloan
 
VENUE & DIRECTIONS
 
The workshop will take place in the Denys Wilkinson Building of the Physics Department on the 8th of September. Directions can be found in the here.
 
SCHEDULE
14.00-14.10
Welcome
Roger Davies
(University of Oxford)
14.10-15.00 Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter [abstract]
Justin Read
(University of Surrey)
15.00-15.50
Decade of the WIMP [abstract]
Rocky Kolb
(University of Chicago)
15.50-16.20 Coffee Break  
16.20-17.10
The Level of Fine-Tuning It Takes to Build a Successful Dark Matter Model [abstract]
Celine Boehm
(University of Durham)
17.10-17.40 Round Table Discussion

 

 

ABSTRACTS

---
Astrophysical Probes of Dark Matter
 
Justin Read (University of Surrey)
 
Dark matter makes up most of the mass of the Universe but remains mysterious. I discuss recent progress in constraining its properties by measuring its distribution in the Universe from tiny dwarf galaxies to giant galaxy clusters. The latest results favour a cold, collisionless particle that must lie beyond the standard model of particle physics. Yet this “standard model” faces a host of apparent fine-tuning problems on small scales. Why are galactic rotation curves so flat? Why do they rise less steeply than simple models predict? Why is there an apparent “acceleration scale” at which the effect of dark matter appears? Why does the Milky Way have so few companion galaxies? I show that all of these problems are naturally solved if dark matter is “heated up” during galaxy formation. I show how such dark matter heating emerges naturally in the latest state-of-the-art numerical simulations, and I present direct evidence for it from nearby dwarf galaxies that orbit the Milky Way. These results provide some of the most compelling evidence for particulate dark matter to date.
 
---

The Decade of the WIMP

Rocky Kolb (University of Chicago)

For over eighty years astronomers have observed that most of the mass of the universe is not seen directly, but rather inferred by its effects on visible matter.  The nature of this unseen “dark” matter has confounded physicists and astronomers for many decades.  The most studied possibility for dark matter is that it is in the form of a cold thermal relic produced in the first second of the bang.  This new species of elementary particle is known as a weakly-interacting massive particle, or WIMP.  Proposed on the late 1970s, only in the present decade have experiments been sufficiently sensitive to test the hypothesis.  The present status of the WIMP hypothesis will be reviewed and the prospectus for discovery in this decade will be discussed.

---
The Level of Fine-Tuning It Takes to Build a Successful Dark Matter Model
 
Celine Boehm (University of Durham)

 

tbc